Home Trends On the Ground in Libya 2021 (what is it really like?)

On the Ground in Libya 2021 (what is it really like?)

by smart

So how is life innLibya nowadays? – It’s very relaxed, at peacen- Is it better than it was? Now it’s better, yeah, before it was the —— and heating,nyou know, but now enough. We want to change,nwant the best for us. Now we want tourists toncome here to raise our… – Economy?n- Yeah! Is the future lookingnbright, do you think? I think yeah. The —— —— uprising in 2011. We saved a lot of Libyan lives. Now, could we have done more after the ——nregime was ended? Well, that’s always, younknow, second-guessing, and I’m sure that there’snmore we could have done but let’s look at what we did do. A complex and highlyn—— situation. The international effortnthat we have led in Libya. We finally have hope that our nightmare of 40nyears will soon be over. Good morningnfrom Tripoli, Libya. I’m in a bit of a hurry today. I’ve got to headndown, meet my driver, and then we’re heading alongnthe coast to a different township, and then we’re going to explorendifferent parts of the country, but you’ll see as it unfolds, but yeah, another beautifulnday here in the capital of Libya. Not sure how thenday is going to go, you never reallynknow in this country. If you didn’t see thenlast video, check that out because we gotnin a bit of hot water, we kind of got taken awaynin a —— car in question, anyway, long story, checknout the video, but for now, let’s go jump on the roadnsee what else Libya brings, always a bit nervous in thenmornings here because it’s very strict especially with the camera andnthings, so got to be on the lookout. I’ll ask him, yeah. Salaam Aleikum Okay, so we’ve arrivednin a place called Sabrata but let me explainnwhat happened. So, I come out of the hotel, there’s a —— Cruisernsitting there waiting for me. I get a phone callnfrom the reception, there’s somebody herenfor you it’s the ——, and then my driver picks me up we drive, and we’vengot a —— escort again which have you seennin the past videos this isn’t the first timenthis has happened. We had a private —— escort, a car leading us throughnthe city with its sirens on and lights flashing, getting carsnto move out of the way for us. Once we got to this, the edge of this ——nofficer’s area that he’s allowed to operate in, then we moved on tonanother —— officer, so this other —— car moved innseamlessly took over the escort, and the other one that took usnfor the first part dropped away, then this other car took us thennext stage until he dropped away. They’re constantly monitoring us,nand you know it’s for our own safety, so you know much respect andnthank you to the —— officers. They’ve been very kind to us, and we’ve arrived innthis place called Sabrata. So, there’s lots of buildings,nyou know, all over Libya, you know, even if you’re in thenmiddle of nowhere in the desert you see buildings with —— ——nand things and today was no different. We’ve seen lots of reallynbadly damaged buildings even a bridge was wipednout, so we had to go around it. Anyway, we’re here. There’snsome Roman ruins here. That’s the kind of thingnthat happens here in Libya is, you know, we’re herento see the historic sites, and you know to get any access, I’ve said this a thousandntimes is an absolute privilege, so I’m very grateful that you knownwe see what we see on the way, but mainly we’renhere to see the sights, we do meet people on the waynand ask them questions and things about how life is herenand pick up what we can, but yeah we’ve gotnto stick to the program, it’s very strict, it’snvery, very controlled. Anyway, let’s see whatnwe can find in here, and then we’renheading back to Tripoli, and hopefully, I’ll be ablento show you more of Tripoli that’s mainly whatnI’m interested in, yeah we’ll come innhere that’s how it works, and then we’ll see whatnelse we can come across. So, we’ve explored aroundnthis site in Sabrata a little bit, spent an hour or so overnthere in the other ruins, but this is definitely mynfavorite part, have a look at this. So well maintainednthe columns over there. If you’re into historynthen and you wanna, you know, come tonLibya take the chance, I highly recommendnit because you have something likenthis which, you know, if this was innEurope or something there’d be thousandsnof tourists here, but it’s pretty much empty and thesenaround me they’re all local tourists, and a few of them are with me, andnwe also have —— following us around, but it’s yeah, it’s justnabsolutely incredible to have a place like thisnto yourself, you know. Mussolini actually visited here, there’s a photo of him sittingndown here, really incredible. – Hi, how are you?n- How are you? – Welcome to our country.n- Thank you very much. I’m happy, I’m gladnthere is someone here to take pictures, and videos,nand share this history, our history. Yeah, to show thenother side of Libya, right. I’m glad. – Where are you from?n- New Zealand. – Oh, interesting.n- Do you see many tourists? No, I am from Libya. No, but do you see manynforeigners around, or it’s rare? – I see someone from Espanha.n- Spain? Yeah, because I speak Spanish,nso he come to take pictures here, and he comes tonTripoli, the capital. I don’t know, see if younknow the place is Mitra. Mitra? In Tripoli, is so interesting. Ifnyou can, give me your number… Yeah, yeah, sure. And I will sendnto you this article. Oh great. – I want to share this…n- With the world. – Yeah, my name is Eve.n- Eve, I’m Nick. – Nice to meet you.n- Nick, me too. So how is life in Libya nowadays? – It’s very relaxed, at peace.n- Is it better than it was? Now it’s better, yeah. Before it was the —— andnheating, you know, but now enough. We want to change,nwe want the best for us. Now we want tourists toncome here to raise our… – Economy.n- Yeah. Is the future lookingnbright, do you think? I think. – Yeah, yeah.n- Yeah. If everyone changed fromnhimself, so with love and peace. Yeah, yeah, beautiful. – And it is my pleasure to know you.n- Yeah, you too. Send me a message,nand we’ll connect. I really hope that Libyancontinues to improve, you know. I hope with the young peoplenlike me and all we want to change, we want, I mean, enough. It was a sad year 2019, thankngod now we… I hope we go right. – Right, positive future.n- Yeah, exactly. – My English not it’s not very good.n- Better than my Arabic, okay. – Do you know some?n- Only a few words. I speak fluently Spanish. Oh wow, nice havenyou traveled in Spain? – Yeah, and to America Latina.n- Okay, Latin America. Yeah. – What countries?n- Colombia, Venezuela, Caracas. What year? Last year I was innCaracas, yeah it is beautiful. It’s a —— place,nI was there in 2019. If you, yeah it is, there’snsome —— places, but at the same time, there’snsome high-class places. You’re a strong person,nyeah, confident, nice. Thank you. Oh well, it wasnlovely to meet you. Same thing. – Send me a message, and we’ll talk.n- Okay, all right. Thanks bye, thank you. I just want to take a quick secondnout and say thank you very much to Private Internet AccessnVPN for sponsoring this video. I’m sure by now younknow what a VPN is, but if you don’t, a VPNnis a virtual private network which assigns you a new IPnaddress so you can protect yourself from basically the big badninternet is how I look at it. Whenever you’re signingninto a public wi-fi network, whether it’s at an airport, nor a shopping mall, or a cafe, or somethingnalong those lines, you’re basicallynagreeing for the network to basically take all yourninformation from your phone. When you have anVPN you’re basically putting a buffer, anblockage between that. Other benefits of anVPN is you can actually access geo-blocked content onnwebsites like Netflix, even YouTube. There’s some things on YouTube that younhave to be in certain countries to watch. I’m often using a VPN to watchnshows on Netflix and things that are maybe only available innthe UK or in America, for example. I use a VPN everynday on all my devices, and I have done itnfor a few years now. Private Internet Access isnavailable on all platforms, Windows, Mac OS, Android,niOS and many others. A strict no-logs policy is in place. You can use one subscription tonprotect up to 10 devices at the same time. There’s a 30-daynmoney-back guarantee. If you use the link innthe description below, it’ll only cost youn$2.08 a month for three years plusntwo months free. So, thank you tonprivate internet access for sponsoring thisnvideo, back to Libya. We then went for a walk aroundnthe streets of downtown Tripoli. This time I’m filming on my phonenbecause if you saw the last video walking around with mynbig camera didn’t end well. But you can see the streetsnhere. It feels very stable. People are going aboutntheir day selling their goods, really beautiful old citynwith the Italian architecture. So, I’m back in Europe now. What an insanentrip that was in Libya. It felt a lot safer than Inhad expected it to feel. Of course, there was a lot ofnpresence of authorities and things but again reiterating thatnthey treated me very well. I had you guys ask me somenquestions on my Instagram. I’m going to address some of those. There was a lot aboutnsome specific topics, so I’m going to try andncover them into one answer and then I’ll move on tona few individual questions. The question I wasnasked the most was about visa and accessninto the country, and as you know, like I mentionednin the start of the videos, I’ve been trying to getnto Libya for two years. A friend of mine callednJordan actually gave me the contact details of Abubaker,nwho was my tour guide, and he was able to facilitate thenvisa process, and the application, and the flights and everything,nand everything on the ground. As you know, getting intonLibya itself that’s the first hurdle and then traveling withinnLibya is also very complicated. In terms of how the visanprocess is, you know, because I mentionednit’s a business visa, I can’t really go into detailsnbecause it’s quite a sensitive topic and I don’t really want to you knowngo into extreme details about that just because thisnis obviously public. If any of you areninterested in going to Libya and you likenwhat you saw in my videos, or you want to seenmore of the country, you want to see itnwith your own eyes, experience it,nexperience the feelings, it is quite nerve-wrackingnsometimes, but I did feel a lot safer in Libyanthan I have in other countries I visited. I had a few questionsnasking me how does it rate in terms of how intimidatednyou felt or how unsafe you felt. Honestly speaking, Libya is nowhere nearnhow unsafe I’ve felt in other countries, which is really surprising considering thenmedia over the last decade of the —— and things which obviously did happen, andnit has been —— in the past. Currently, fingersncrossed it stays that way. It’s reasonably stable now, younknow, relative to the region of Libya. If you do want to visit, I willnleave Abubaker information below, his email address and hisnWhatsApp phone number, and you can get in touch withnhim and let him know that I sent you, and he can facilitate the process,nand you know even if you’re not sure just ask him a few questionsnhow it works and things if you want and he will help you out. He speaks really good English. Don’t hesitate to reach out to Abubaker ifnyou want to go to Libya now or in the future. I got a question herenfrom Carly Seedall: Hey Nick, did you get anchance to talk to any migrants or make any observations aboutnthe migrant situation in Libya? This is a topic I wanted to cover,nbut I didn’t really have the chance to do it on the ground, but I’mnhappy to speak about it now. There are many migrantsnin Libya from what I saw, you see them waiting on the side ofnthe road to pick up odd jobs and things, and I did see them workingnsome labor jobs, and of course, Libya is one of the mainngoals for migrants to head to and then from there they’llntry and head to Europe, maybe Italy, to somenMediterranean islands. It’s unfortunate that I didn’t getnthe chance to interview one of them. I wish I could haventold more of that story, but as I said, it’s notneasy to film in Libya, and I did push thenboundaries a lot, you know, that’s something that I didn’tnmention too much in the videos, but I was really pushingnthe boundaries, you know, really trying to getna greater access which I did, and Inwas very grateful for, but you know there’s sonmuch more in that country that I would love tonhave dug up you know. Here is a questionn21stcenturyhousehusband: Hi Nick! Love your videos. My question is, what arenLibyan authorities so afraid of? I don’t necessarilynknow if they’re afraid, but I guess you’renmeaning like why were there the ——nescorts and things. The reason is because foreignersnare just so rare in Libya, you know, it might be because, you know, theynfeel it an honor to help out a foreigner, it could also be they wouldn’t want onnthe off chance of something happen to me, it would reflect verynbadly on the country, international media would cover itnand things, and it would just not be good especially in this climaticntime that Libya is going through where things are lookingnpositive, you know, you’ve seen earlier in thisnvideo the young girl that we met she was saying, you know, thenfuture is looking more positive and hopefully thenfighting is in the past, so to have somethingnhappen to a foreigner and for it to be coverednby international media that wouldn’t be a good look fornthe country and they’re aware of that. So again, you know, thenauthorities treated me very well, but, you know, they were cautious, and they were aware of where Inwas and when I was in those places. Teddy, what was your favoritenthing about this trip and why? Definitely, having my preconceivednideas absolutely shattered, you know. I thought that Libyanwas going to be up there with one of the most intense andnmost —— countries I’ve visited. Again, going back on the brutal past, andnthat’s not even you know a year ago or so, they were still having majornissues with —— and things, and it’s very evidentnyou’ve seen in the footage, the —— —— and the heavynpresence of —— and things. It was significantlynsafer than I expected, and I felt a lot morencalm than I had thought. One of the main reasons Inlike going to countries like this to really see whatnit’s like on the ground after seeing what it’s likenin the media and things and to actually get a taste ofnstanding on the dirt of a place like Libya with the history, you know,nthe very sad history of course, but to be there on this hinge of when it’s movingninto a positive direction, again that’s going off thenpeople that I’ve spoken to, that’s what they’ve toldnme, and that’s all I can go off. That was probably the highlight,na combination of all those things. So this is another question that I gotna lot from many local Libyan people. Ozzzigee asks, will younbe checking out Benghazi? I had many other questions askingnwill I be going to the eastern things. I would have loved tonhave gone to the east and to explore more, and tonmeet the people over there, but it just wasn’t logisticallynpossible at the time. I hope in the futurenthat’ll be possible. I really do hope that I can makenit over to that part of the country, possibly in the future and meet somenpeople, hear what they have to say. Obviously, there’s beennlots of infighting and things, and I would have loved to see,nyou know, all sides of the country. Unfortunately, you know,nagain, to get what I got, I’m extremely lucky tonhave got that, but of course, I always would have wanted more andnwanted to explore more of the country. Question from Liam Ellison: Love yournvideos mate, series in Libya is amazing. Thank you very much, Liam. My question for you is, as a young person,do younrecommend traveling to places where the media tells you not tongo if you’ve never traveled solo? Complex question, itndepends in what context the media is tellingnyou not to go there, and if you’ve neverntraveled before, I would recommend going tonsome more tame places first, not just, you know,njumping in the deep end, it’s probably goingnto be quite the shock, it’s best to work your waynup like anything in life I guess. I always recommend you knownpeople to visit Thailand and things first. Thailand is a great country, andnhopefully, when it opens back up after this situationnthat we’re all facing, Thailand’s always angreat place to start. There is the culture shock,nbut it’s very tourist-friendly, and you still get to, you know, to see andifferent culture and meet lots of people, so I would recommendnstarting in like southeast Asia and then from there you knownslowly start to push the boundaries. India is also a good placenbecause it’s extreme travel it’ll teach you a lotnof lessons about life. I highly recommend Indianas the first kind of place to go, the university ofntravel I think India. Every time you go to India,nyou learn lessons, you know, it’s one of the hardestncountries to travel, but one of the most funnbecause of how rewarding it is when you face these challengesnthat’s what I would recommend. Definitely don’t recommend asnyour first trip to just fly to Libya or Afghanistan, or wherevernit may be start small, build your way up and ifnyou like it, then continue. I’m not promoting anynkind of extreme travel. I think it’s up to the individual hownwhat they want to do with their lives. If you want to go to somewhere thatnsomebody tells you you shouldn’t go that should be yournchoice, you take the risks, if something happens to you,nof course, that’s on your back, like if anything happened to me, that’s mynchoice I take that I take full responsibility you got to make the decisionnyourself but for sure start small. So I got like, I thinkn300 questions, or so. So obviously I can’t answer them all butnthank you so much for all your questions. I did try to, you know, group anlot of them into specific categories. This will be my last video for a little while.nI’m going to be taking a bit of time off YouTube. These trips are quitenintense, as you’ve seen, and the year has been amazingnso far with the filming and things. There was Lebanon,nthere was Brazil and Honduras,nChernobyl and now Libya, and so it’s beennquite action-packed, and a lot of these countriesnare quite emotionally gripping to do themnback to back to back. It can be quite intense sometimes, so it’s important for me to,nyou know, take a step back, regroup and then come backnand then make more videos. I do have my next countries in mindnalready, so don’t worry about that, but yeah, I hope that you’llnstay tuned for the next series, but I’ll be back in a while afternI take a bit of time for myself. I hope that you guysncan understand that. I am again blown awaynby your support as always, it’s unreal tonthink where we are and almost at one millionnsubscribers, you know. I don’t really talk aboutnsubscribers that much but, you know, it is obviously quite significant,nand I’m really touched, and I thank you guysnso much for your support, and I never thought I’d benstanding here saying such a thing. On my break, I will be doingna few Q&A’s on my Patreon some other content over there. If you want to check that out,nI’ll leave the Patreon link below. I’ll just be doing some like general Q&A’s andnmaybe a few clips of some other traveling. I might be doing some likenmountain climbing and things, but nothing too in-depth,njust a few clips here and there. If you want to check that out,nleave the Patreon link below. Thank you again, and thank you to everybodynin Libya for having me in your country. If you want to go or younwant to learn more about it, then hit up Abubakernin the description, he’ll help facilitatenyour trip to Libya. Otherwise, take care of yourselves, people in Northern Hemispherenhave a great summer, people in the Southern Hemisphere,nI hope that you’re keeping warm. I know back where I’m from innNew Zealand, it’s snowing now, so I’m happy to be herenin a t-shirt, to be honest, and in case I don’t see you, good afternoon, goodnevening and good night.


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On the Ground in Libya 2021 (what is it really like?)
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