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Tv & Radio Tonga Vake Tali Folau Global Media Network

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[Music] so [Music] can connect globally [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] my [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Laughter] california [Music] foreign [Music] [Applause] [Music] foreign [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] m [Music] hello [Music] [Music] the [Music] [Music] is [Music] foreign [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Applause] [Music] my [Music] um [Music] foreign [Music] foreign [Music] [Applause] foreign [Applause] [Music] [Music] and really appreciate the so-called so-called pacific islanders covered 19 response team thank you alicia to make this happen so um we can start off so i’d like to ask you um if you can share a little bit about the data right now how is it going both um those are infected and um kobe 19 vaccination we can start off with that and we discuss throughout the one hour malo albito ali si tulua milo emily marlow from a um thank you emily um you know i invited midi five because she’s on the ground doing a lot of our work uh from testing all the way to right now uh providing vaccination clinics to the community um especially in in l.a uh you know data especially around vaccinations that we have um from our work um when we look at the case and death rates uh when we when we continue to calculate it based on uh the population sizes our rates are still higher than everybody else’s even though the actual numbers are lower because the numbers are lower for every all the other communities um i just looked at some of our l.a county data you know that we’ve been tracking so far and it’s clear because we work really closely with the l.a county department of public health and even between um even between the 1st of july and today there were 20 new covet cases in pacific islander community in l.a county and so the truth is people are are still getting infected and last week the county put out a report that uh 98 of the people that are getting a positive covet infection when they get tested are people that are unvaccinated and 99 of people that are that end up being hospitalized because of covid are unvaccinated people and so you can uh understand from that data that people that are unvaccinated are more likely to are the ones that are getting uh infected and so for our people that have tested positive focus that our pacific islander in la county county because we keep track of all of that data all the time um you know but if it looks like that in l.a county we can suspect that it looks like that in other parts of the state for our population for our people especially you know uh find out uh you know everybody’s gathering we have a lot of graduations churches are open again and and so um at least for case and death rates um and even between i think between june 1st and today there were four new deaths that were related to covet in the pacific under communion ellie county so you know foreign in l.a county but you can imagine that it’s probably very similar in our other communities in terms of vaccination rate the state of california you know they of course but we have been challenging them because the data does not look accurate for example some of the data shows that um that there is more than a hundred percent vaccination rate in some of our age groups which is impossible and a really clear example that we’re looking at right now we just had a we just presented to ellie county their vaccination committee because they have reported that over 23 000 pacific islanders have received at least one dose of the vaccine in l.a county those that are over 16 years old but when you look at the total population of pacific islanders in l.a county of that age there’s only 21 000 something so they’re reporting more people that are pacific islander that are vaccinated than there are in the county so we’re we’re working with our counties and with the state to um to help them look at the data more accurately they’re reporting us as high numbers we in the community and you know medifiva can probably speak to this we know that that’s not you know even 75 that doesn’t sound right based on our interaction with our people and so our conclusion is we’re in the dark you know okay the data can’t even tell us what we need to know so the best thing for us to do is to keep on encouraging our community to get vaccinated because the k the data can’t tell us where we are at where we’re at when the dark so the best thing we can do is just to continue to uh get the create clinics so people can get vaccinated and make it easy and then you know come to programs like this i know there are more tongans um getting um kobe 19 nowadays from our award in in other community gatherings thank you very much for making the time i know you’re working with the community especially in los angeles and we love to hear from you [ __ ] you can give us a little bit background about what you’re doing in los angeles i know there are other communities in other states they want to know more about what activities you guys doing there thank you melee [Music] positive is [Music] but over these months we have vaccinated thousands and thousands of tongan people okay [Music] um pacific islanders in the future uh but once that established uh you will be a better and and bigger more beneficial for our tongue and people here in l.a foreign [Music] uh do you see any difference whatsoever okay i’m i but not just a couple of people here and there uh putting up a community tongan community and then collapse after a year or so you know what do you think from the organization you go levine there have been a lot of of efforts over many years over the decades you know to build a community you know but it’s hard it’s really a lot of work to work in community-based uh organizations or in non-profit um you know and and i understand many of our people have to take care of their families you will never get rich working in non-profit there’s it’s a lot of work for no money um you know and you know that’s just the truth of it um you know people are doing a lot of different kinds of work and more people are coming together to contribute to it only on non-profits so i think you know the church leaders are more open to you know you know because i i can say 10 years ago it was harder for us to even have a conversation with some of our church leaders they’re busy you know but nowadays when we have people like melifaiva and people like leafa and a lot of our leaders you know community as it’s easier for them to get our church leaders to listen to to what we’re trying to do um and even the partnership you know that didn’t exist for us 10 years ago so i think what’s what’s a little bit different now is that there are more people and don’t have to create a non-profit organization to do that work but we do need more we do need more people to be uh to contribute to that work because uh it’s it’s necessary you know um you can’t just have one organization i think that’s where we are right now we have a couple that are sprinkled throughout the state i think um you know llamas in the bay area you know riverside um it’s called malo um and the tongan community service center used to be in la um but has closed down and you know trying to help uh contribute you know help medifiva build that back up or you know create an organization but you see that you see that the same even in um utah i think there’s like two tongan organizations i think we need to we need to do a little bit more of building in that way for our people and you know it’s easier to find a foreign if there’s more people right right right i love a gay man it takes a lot of people to come together and make it work for everyone first out of my pocket to buy food and kind of help people out uh and then finding out there are other organizations that they can help and the more i put myself into it the more i know it’s like wow we really need help we really need a tongan community to to call the one-stop shop for people to call and say hey um i need food especially what the pandemic was going on last year people calling me and uh i did the best i could to help them out but at the same time this is the tongan community and i didn’t have a problem of calling it the tongan community but yet we are reaching out to the hispanic to the blacks to the folks out there who are not talking uh to help even with our food distribution we give out more to other ethnic groups than the tongan because we have tons in the area and uh most of them they come but some they don’t come in and receive the food but um my goal is in alicia knows this too i reached out to her to see what can we actually do to uh to establish the tongan community at the same time um having people to have the passion it’s all about having the passion to be able to help our folks i was thinking of bringing you know of approaching young people uh but they’re too busy for you know they work they have school and all that but i also was looking at the people in my age group can they be able to help some will say yes yes yes but sometimes our tongan people when they say yes it’s a no and i keep on believing that they’re saying yes that they wanted to work but i i think you know it’s like what the balancing people says eating the elephant you have to bite it a little bit at the time and there will be some other times that maybe uh the tongan people will come together and and re-establish the tongan community that we’re talking about right right here good good when i experience s [Laughter] development trust this is the another and also they’re kind of linking together you know kind of we call it the vtf pacifica global media network at the pacific islanders yeah now and i’m starting to invite um organization pacific islanders organizations i think we need to do a study now um to identify all those organizations and the pacific islanders so we can we can network what do you think yeah i probably have a list of all of our organizations uh because we you know we work together on different things okay they’ve been here longer also you know so you know for example the samoan community development center it’s probably one of the oldest pacific islander organizations in the country it’s been around for decades i think i think they just celebrated uh over 30 years or something like that or maybe 50 i don’t remember but they’ve been around for a long time and they’re still here uh tongan community service center i’m and that one was established in the 80s um and so you know we have but yeah we don’t have enough tongan organizations you know we have a lot of different organizations but we do need more tongan organizations and and i think we need it yeah i think i i think alice is right uh we know tonga we don’t know that we need this we need that we need more of stuff the problem is how do we start it right how can we bring people who have the passion to serve our community without pay just for a little while in order to [Music] their little family something that they can go and call it home the foreign but the problem is like what i said earlier is how do we start it right with what we have right sometimes we don’t have what it takes but what can we do as a tongan people to help our own people to get to that point of studying they’ve been here for a long time they know how the system works in america right but at the same time i think without all of that we need to start establishing it’s it’s kobe tanya [Laughter] when we talk about when we see how its impact i i covered 19 at autumn for sure i always tell people it’s not that we don’t know we don’t it’s not that we’ve never done it before you know you know if you um you see this exists in other places people know how to do that and how to come together and and like feel my fana and give their time and energy to something i i haven’t yet figured out why it doesn’t translate to building for some for our people here right i think people can do it within you know they see but i think it’s i don’t know why it’s harder to to step outside of that and to do it you know maybe maybe it’s still too foreign maybe the structure of it is still too foreign maybe it’s still too american i’m not sure you know maybe you two have some insight on that why we need to participate county what’s going on with the pacific islanders how they behave how they house their you know in our health and now social economic things like that i don’t know i hope not okay participate and this is [Music] they don’t come to the church or i can get church leaders how are you guys doing how are you eating behavior how’s the alcohol and the drugs doing with you guys they don’t go ask at the church leaders in the church they had to go through a channel and a system in place participating one way or another they will turn around oh that’s it good good good okay they have everything they have all the opportunities for oh there they are they need more help with smoking um i’m happy to dedicate this one hour you come in or you invite anybody that want to come in and we can talk about this 19 response team for the next three weeks but i want to dedicate this the money is there may have from the media part of my mouth or the media the money is there it’s just a matter of casio maya commune i i i i i kawataki or for one that we have a tongan community a government oh los angeles that willing to happen you know um but this can be [Music] to figure out how we can start but i think we can start with this invite people to come in and see what they say i was just gonna add that maybe you know as you’re talking me maybe that the hard part is you have to be an advocate right you have to be somebody that’s willing to speak up and then you know that goes against the way that our people are and the way that we’re taught to be as tongans you know you’re supposed to be you know um you don’t speak up unless you know if you speak up maybe you know people think that you’re potto but in this kind of work you have to be somebody that that tells the county look you’re not paying attention to us or look we need to have vaccination sites in our churches for our people to come you have to be willing to be somebody that speaks up in order for for the work to exist right uh but i don’t i don’t know maybe that goes against everything that we’re taught how to be as tongans and maybe that’s why this work isn’t as valued is because it goes against everything that we’re taught you have to be willing to be an advocate to do it i don’t know what do you think medley yeah man it’s uh the way i have been dealing with the county of getting the uh the tone and vaccinations aside for us like what alice is said it was not an easy thing to do it’s uh to negotiate with them to hey we have ton people we have pacific islanders that we have our own needs that we need to have our own to where it made our people comfortable of going to rather than sending our people all over the place just because just to get their their um right so uh once it was established the rest was easy and then we continued that work uh for them to come out with their with their nurses from the healthcare department of the la county and to be able to help us do that but the first time it was really hard it’s just like everything else it’s hard to get into something that even the county was not used to if they they just shift everyone they bundle everybody black blue white tone someone whatever into different places but when you but when i come in and ask very specifically for our tournament community it’s like a tongan pacific islander yes so uh now the hardest part is after that now it’s getting the site done it’s getting our leaders getting our churches together to say hey you don’t have to make your own appointment or you don’t have to uh to go to downtown l.a or go to pomona you live in l.a and you go to different areas for your for your vaccine we have our own you can go there now that is fine we have our own place that we can go to it’s getting our own people to get there so it’s sometimes what i have noticed from the beginning of the year someone in certain family or a certain community especially the town has to get sick from povet in order for them to open up the rest and say whoa whoa wait i need to go get mine done right you know okay and i know this perfect i know my people are in the ring [Music] i don’t know so honestly i don’t know if this is crazy idea for you when you talk to the county i want to go to each individual houses [Laughter] standing i think they’re starting i think they’re starting to to to try to have like door-to-door like to actually administering vaccines in people’s homes we might ask for that because i’m telling you one thing though for me i want to be dawa daina i want to go back to what we used to be knowing that we cannot be going back to what we used to be i want to have a dawah diner for me right i don’t want my next-door neighbor my family next door to hold me back because they have not even got their their vaccine it’s just crazy you know it for me we need some kind of system to where that we can reach to everyone that’s the hardest part right now i talked to the nurses when we were doing the vaccine today what can we actually do to make this all happen to help our own people our 12 year old and up the top from the parents who are vaccinated their their their 12 year olds and up they’re so happy now they’re going back to school they don’t have to worry about them getting sick from other kids yet at the same time there are parents tongue and parents sending their children to school with no vaccine they are eligible to get the vaccine now we have been vaccinated the 12 and above now we’re talking about the six year old and above with one shot from kaiser if they’re not bringing the 12 year old to be vaccinated how about they’re six-year-olds and i’m only talking about the pacific islands our tongan people how can we make them hang it’s okay i think it’s a wrong word that i say how can we make them that they have their vaccine some churches have 20. they still have 80 percent of their churches that needs to be vaccinated you know that’s negative and i am waiting for the day sunday that i can go with my nurses and you know to to the churches and say okay you you you we haven’t got your vaccine now it’s time yeah we might just have to end up doing that moving forward is you know have it have it at a have a vaccine site at a church on a sunday afternoon i was thinking of you know they can put it there and if you know but then again you cannot force people to tell you right so how it it just somehow that we need the church leaders i mean they’re so tired foreign [Music] [Music] available because i can almost i can promise you this pretty soon the vaccine is gonna be you’re gonna pay for it to get it yeah just like i just like the uh the flu shots yes you don’t pay for it with your um uh with cash but it goes through your insurance but i have a feeling that with the uh with the covet with the with the shots you’re going to pay for it yeah i i think i want to just add one more thing is um is that the the the delta variant of of covid is is what’s uh it’s a big threat right now you know um i don’t know how much uh our people understand the difference between the the virus the original virus and the delta variant which is just a different different form of the original virus that it’s a it’s more transmissible so you can you know if you’re unvaccinated you can catch it easier and uh in our community we’re we were already more vulnerable than everybody else because of you know you know we’ve explained it so many times why our people are more vulnerable but the delta variant which la you know put out a a warning last week they the county suggested for people to wear their mask because it was really spreading in l.a county um but it it are our people it’s more transmissible and it it causes more severe reaction so you know for our people that are unvaccinated there’s even higher risk for being affected by this new variant and i know that the people yeah i don’t know what else to say i just wanted to share that in case people are not are thinking about it’s the same old virus it’s not the same old virus this is a different this it’s not a different vibe it’s the same virus it’s just a little bit different yeah yeah the um state in the ihimao county and the florida yeah yeah there was a kansas city was saying that all their icu beds were at maximum now last weekend after uh fourth of july and uh and the states that have the lowest vaccination rate are the ones that are seeing higher covet spikes right now wow it’s scary [Music] me [Music] um [Music] foreign foreign [Music] foreign [Music] foreign look hello [Music] ah [Music] um [Music] [Music] oh [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] federal level [Music] foreign [Laughter] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Applause] [Music] here uh my is [Music] [Music] i’m trying you trying um foreign foreign foreign family m [Music] um um [Music] [Music] m [Music] um [Music] um [Music] [Music] [Music] vietnamese foreign [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] oh [Music] [Music] um [Music] [Music] hey [Music] [Music] um [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] that’s because everyone 12 and older is now eligible for a vaccine kavika then found a vaccine location for his sister his sister sent an appointment link to her best friend who reminded her business partner who then well you get the idea and it all started today with kawika tomorrow it can start with you it’s time to let our friends and family know that vaccines prevent nearly 100 percent of hospitalizations and deaths from covid we can do this visit vaccines.gov today to find vaccines near you paid for by the us department of health and human services [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] seattle in king [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] my [Music] [Music] me foreign [Music] that might be [Music] um [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] foreign foreign foreign the question i foreign um is foreign activities okay foreign okay um foreign [Applause] foreign [Applause] foreign foreign [Music] oh nobody foreign foreign foreign [Laughter] foreign he foreign wow foreign foreign my okay it goes back to our voting system foreign foreign it’s going to be a long process it’s going to be a non-profit as well yeah non-profit process okay community center appointments foreign okay foreign [Music] my mom [Music] hallelujah [Music] hallelujah [Music] do [Music] [Music] do so [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] 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